5 Useful Facts About StumbleUpon Traffic

StumbleUpon may have been around for awhile, but marketers have been mixed in their advice about using it. As far as social media tools go, it is much different than most. Rather than allowing for interaction, it is used as a discovery tool. You introduce people to your website through this randomizer, increasing the chances of your users finding you based on how many pages you have to share.

***Take part in the thread: Is SstumbleUpon any good for building traffic to my site?

They also have a paid advertising program. StumbleUpon Paid Discovery service links people directly to your pages without any clicks-through from ads. It is supposed to remove the most difficult step, as so many users are jaded about following real advertisements thanks to an increase in shady pop-ups and sidebar ads.

How StumbleUpon Paid Discovery Works

Using the Paid Discovery tool is simple enough. You sign up and then pay a rate per Stumble, so you are only paying for the people who see your link. There is a base pay, and then you add ala cart based on specifications.

For example, the base Stumble is $0.10 each. Adding things like location and age targeting are between $0.02 and $0.06 each, upping the price of each Stumble to as much as $0.35 a piece.

What you are ultimately paying for is traffic that comes directly from StumbleUpon. But is it worth it? Here are five facts about StumbleUpon traffic that you can use to decide if it is the right tool for your campaign.

  1. SU Is Still a Social Platform: Don’t make the mistake of assuming just because it is a traffic driver that StumbleUpon is just another marketing tool. It is still a social platform, and one that is increasing its user base by the month. People like a content driven social network, as it provides a unique formula that takes it out of the usual micro or connecting spheres (think Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn). It is more comfortable among the category of Pinterest and YouTube, as it is there to push traffic through content itself, and not engagement. While you have to change your tactics of interacting, you still have to look at it through the same lens. For example, sharing your own content is fine. But it is not likely to get you a large following on its own. Instead, you have to engage socially by sharing third party content relevant to the interests of your target demographic. This will ultimately increase the numbers of users who regularly return to your stumbles, and so your site.
  2. Mint Has 180,000 Unique Visits From SU Alone: In probably its most enticing case study, Mint is a primary success for StumbleUpon. The financial site itself stated that SU was the most effective and cost-efficient form of advertising they had used, including an unnamed social network (ahem, Facebook) they had used for PPC. That number isn’t in total, it is per month. They managed to both increase traffic on a consistent monthly basis that continues today, while increasing their user demographic to include the elusive 18: 25 women category they had wanted to more strongly influence into using their product.
  3. Only a Percentage Of Traffic Will Be Paid: Looking at the Mint example again, all of the primary traffic came from free campaigns. Only 44% came from Paid Discovery. An additional 20% came from shared Paid Stumbles, so when they said it was cost efficient, that was obviously very much the case. SU’s other case study, the Wisconsin Milk Board, saw an addition 60% traffic increase from Paid Stumbles. So while you use Paid Discovery to increase your traffic boosts, there is evidence to suggest a fair amount of what you see will come from free Stumbles.
  4. Good Content Provides Increasing Traffic Over Time: Nicholas Tart of Income Diary presented an interesting look into his own use of StumbleUpon. He said that he had submitted a single, high quality piece of content that was “content StumbleUpon users like”, and measured the results. Case studyOn that single piece of content, he got an astonishing 158,000 Stumbles over time. Most of this started to happen five months after it was initially submitted, which teaches an important lesson: timing is different for SU campaigns. Where with other social networks you would hope to see a quick increase in shares, and possible viral status once in a blue moon, SU is a more patient form of marketing. It has to be planted and allowed to grow. Be sure to check out Tart’s article for some interesting advice on improving your results. Here’s also a very actionable article on getting traffic from StumbleUpon (supported by my own case study).
  5. SU Might Be The Best Hidden Treasure On The Social Web: Check out this post by Shareaholic. In the beginning of 2014, SU saw a 30% increase in referrals. In fact, it saw the highest increase of all of the social networks, along with Facebook, Pinterest, and Google+. Sites like Twitter, Youtube, Reddit and LinkedIn saw a fall in referral rate. Granted, the numbers for SU could be because marketers started to really catch on to the platform’s potential in the last two quarters of 2013. But it doesn’t change the potential seen in those gains. StumbleUpon might be the best hidden treasure on the social web, and really worth a shot if you are failing to see the traffic or influence you hoped on more saturated, less content focused social networks,

Conclusion

Nowadays StumbleUpon may not be the most talked about social tool out there. But it is one of the most promising, and it is growing by the day. The statistics speak for themselves, and seeing the progress made by sites like Mint using it is nothing short of inspiring.

If you are looking for a traffic driver that will be based more on content than on links, you might want to try it out. Less focused on building through clicks-through, you can see how it might be more appealing to the average social user. Plus, the competition is less fierce, thanks to its status as being under the radar.

Have you used StumbleUpon for marketing? How did it go? Let us know in the comments!

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